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"We must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” - Elie Weisel

“If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor." - Desmond Tutu

"There comes a time when neutrality and laying low become dishonorable. If you’re not in revolt, you’re in cahoots. When this period and your name are mentioned, decades hence, your grandkids will look away in shame." - David Brooks

21 responses to “Now Pawtucket wants in on the Invenergy deal…”

  1. salgal

    Does Pawtucket get their water from the same source, Providence Water? If so, how would that be a backup? I suppose if Johnston didn’t “save” enough water for their residents that could be an issue.

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  2. Fred

    Come on Pawtucket residence, now is your chance to get involved. Show us what you got. Don’t disappoint Rhode Island.

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  3. Kcinri

    Blood is in the water now. The sharks are moving in. How predictable.

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  4. Barry Schiller

    Lets have a little sympathy for Pawtucket struggling with poverty and inadequate resources, that lost its downtown commerce and even factories to suburban communities, even allowing I-95, mostly serving thru traffic, to slice thru the city disconnecting its grid. And unlike Burrillville, they didn’t vote for climate-change-is-a-hoax Trump.
    I think less attention needs to paid to combating production of energy (though in this case the sacrifice of so much woodland and water is truly a sin) and more to reducing the demand for it.

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    1. Sergio526

      Your description of Pawtucket sounds a heck of a lot like Woonsocket, who truly understood what they were saying no to and have a lot more need for that money than Johnston and Pawtucket.

      The opposition to this power plant isn’t just environmental. The power plant is unnecessary. No one in RI has the need for the electricity from this new plant nor will anyone be using it. It will not lower our bills! All it’s going to do is clear out a ton of trees and pollute the air, the soil, and the ground water (not to mention the constant noise that can be heard for miles) for residents who moved to/live in Burrillville specifically to be away from these things.

      It’s pretty frustrating. If you’re a “tree hugger,” and you pound your chest about it for years, only to be met with “If you want to be a tree hugger, then go move to the woods and leave us alone already!” So you do, you find a beautiful plot of land up in Pascoag and you build a minimally invasive home there. Then, two years later, the state says they’re going to allow a natural gas power plant to be built two miles from your home and there’s nothing you can do about it! ONE WE WON’T EVEN BE USING! Can you understand how irritating that is?!

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      1. cailin rua

        I don’t think you’ve learned the drill, Sergio. “T-O-D” – those three big capital letters are what you seem to have missed in the discourse around here – “Transit Oriented Development”. Grow Smaht, the Urban Land Institute, the Sierra Club and the Chambers of Commerce don’t want you living out there in the first place.

        Lesson #1 in entry level New Urbanism, New Urbanism 101 – covers how local real estate cash flows can be harnessed by Real Estate Investments Trusts which have tax advantages the local mom and pops who will soon be run out of business don’t have, and which are further spiced up with tax amnesties and tax increment financing and served up to out of state and foreign vulture capitalists chomping at the bit to get a piece of what’s left of the urban industrial carcass.

        I could get you the number of Meredith Management or Brady Sullivan or many of the others who could set you up in a nice place in Olneyville. Social justice is all about having an 1800 dollar a month loft apartment with brick walls that have no insulation. It’s all about reducing the carbon footprint.

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        1. Fred

          I think you are not seeing the whole picture over here in Pascoag. They are in the process of building low income housing three miles east from the proposed power plant as we speak. Houses and apartment buildings.

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          1. cailin rua

            I don’t know where to begin, Fred. My brother lives in Burrillville, my sister lives in Chepachet. My parents lived in Harmony before they died and I went to grammar school in Greenville when I was growing up but it’s been a while since I’ve been out to Pascoag. I can remember when the only bus that ran out there was one provided from the ABC bus lines which worked out of North Providence at the time, I believe. I think RIPTA has something that will take you to the Walmart now but people are complaining about legislators from Foster insisting public transit extend to places like Foster and Pascoag.

            My point was the “rugged individualist” is no longer in vogue. The Clock Tower, the former Stillwater Mills, project is another thing altogether. A 2 bedroom w/ one bath there will go for around 1500/mo. for 1400 sq ft. I think utilities might be included with that. Down in Olneyville, you’ll pay 1500 for a 1 bedroom and get a 1/2 bath more but 500 sq ft less. The Rising Mills site does not mention anything about utilities. So I guess that makes the Clock Tower a “low income project”.

            There’s LIHTC housing being built in Pascoag or that has been built there according what I’ve read. It’s been a long time since I’ve read any academic papers on the impact neoliberal policy has had on HUD and the implications. I may have some papers bookmarked but I would have to search the browsers I’ve used over the last few years to find them and I don’t know if I actually bookmarked those papers but I think the programs have changed radically since the Nixon years. As I remember all those changes carried implications with them that were far from positive.

            I notice the Clock Tower project was another Durkee Brown Viveiros Werenfels Architects project. They seem to get all the tax credits no else seems to be able to get unless they’re from Kite doing L.E.E.D.S. projects. Shucks, I wonder what that is all about???

            I don’t disagree with everything Barry says, either. I have problems with the approach he takes. We live in an industrial wasteland. In the Clock Tower promotions the brown fields that were cleaned up are touted. Do the people who caused the degradation come up with the reparation funds? No, of course not. As Leona Helmsley has made abundantly clear, it is the little people who must pay to revive the post industrial carcass. Pascoag has certain similarities to Olneyville but it’s kind of remote. The people who left the mess behind are hoping you will help them profit, by restoring what they profited from by devastating our waterways and the land around the factories that they have abandoned for Asia where they can degrade with abandon, for a second time.

            I had a writer friend who worked as press secretary in a pretty important political campaign here back the ’80s. He was from out of state, of course. He had a fondness for a certain line in a very pedestrian classic rock song, “I wish I didn’t know now what I didn’t know then.” I may not know much but I know why he liked that line so much.

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  5. Fred

    Everybody that is giving this power plant the green light is helping commit genocide. This is the type of thing you would see from Hitler.

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  6. Johnnie

    @Fred: To call the power plant genocide is to make light of diminish and trash this conversation. Look up the meaning of genocide.

    Because of the nature of American society, it is difficult for many of us to respond to new developments and events except in ways that are very narrow, shortsighted and self-interested. We always seem to look at the “me” and not the “we.” This power plant is only one small part of the struggles being waged across the country and the world to save the planet and some semblance of a quality of life for us and our posterity.

    We also keep losing sight of the fact that one new power plant is too many. It is a necessity to stop burning fossil fuels now, not a suggestion. The technology exists to transition out of fossil fuels and it could be exponentially increased if the US put the billions in subsidies it gives to the oil and gas cartels into research and development of renewables. We need a new Marshall Plan or ”race to the moon” where our national will and scientific resources are mobilized. However, we have a ruling class that stands in the way.

    It may sound trite, but we need to start “thinking globally and acting locally.” We need to begin to understand our interconnectedness, and how their system of competitiveness — and always seeking some kind of advantage — is sick and destructive to human relationships and life on the planet. Capital thinks and acts globally, and is constrained minimally by nation states. We need to think, plan and fight back globally, too.
    People came from all over the world to Standing Rock. These were people who understood that the fight of Native Americans, and the struggles in their home countries, was all one fight for the future.

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    1. Fred

      Genocide: is intentional action to destroy a people in whole or in part.

      I’m not sure why you think I’m making light of this situation and trashing it. I live 2.5 miles east DOWN WIND of this proposed power plant. I also had very severe asthma a few years back before I changed my diet. So I know what it is like to be gasping for breath, it’s not fun. I will be forced out of my childhood home and have to move out of this state if this plant goes in.

      So don’t tell me I’m making light of this situation, this is my life these people are playing with.

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  7. Johnnie

    Fred, I sympathize with you insofar as you might have to sell your childhood home – something that I would not want to do. But it is not genocide, and cheapens the word and what it denotes.

    And try and see this fight as being more than just something to do with you.

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    1. Fred

      This not being genocide is just your opinion.

      You don’t know me at all, I’m fighting this plant for more than just me. I’m an animal lover and love this town and don’t want to see them destroyed. I have a lot of family members with kids that live in this town also, and some live closer than me to this proposed monster.

      So if you don’t want to accept that the powers at be want to see the world depopulated, than that’s your gig. Keep using fluoride, it’s working for you.

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  8. Fred

    They can’t legally physically take us to the gas chambers. Putting gas plants in peoples backyards are as close as they can get. These gas plants are lining up like football players along the pipe lines. Go Patriots!

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  9. Fred

    Think about. Why are they pushing so hard to put a gas plant there. Because it’s a dead spot in the line. Not enough people around here are getting sick. They tried putting one there before and it never got approved, because it was the wrong place for something like a power plant. There is a hospital and a nursing home a few miles from the proposed site for one. What happens if TB goes full blown again. Where will you be able to go that’s clean to heal? There are already cases of TB popping up.

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  10. Fred

    The reason this plant is getting so many green lights is because everyone is desperate for money and work. I don’t care what you hear in the news, our economy is dying. Just look at all the signs, stores are closing and laying off people daily.

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    1. Sergio526

      And, just to finish your point, that’s no reason to build a dirty power plant in a part of the state that has fought to stay clean and green and has been a destination for people who want to live that way! Other jobs will come, we don’t need to jump onto shady deals with shady companies just because we’re desperate. There are already plenty of dirty jobs available out there that even the desperate won’t do, why isn’t this Invenergy-Raimondo plant considered the same?

      RI won’t benefit from this power plant. We don’t need its electricity and having it won’t lower our bills. Invenergy owes money to almost all municipalities it operates in. Neither RI nor Johnston are guaranteed the money they’re being promised. How do they get out of their commitments? Probably the same way they’re all of a sudden allowed to build a natural gas power plant in an area that already violates federal noise levels and has not yet reached its goals on CO2 emissions. The same way they put on large, public, dog and pony shows to draw people’s attention while ironing out secret back-room deals with the crooks running Johnston. They’re a shady company who have done shady things at EVERY SINGLE STEP of this process. They have a long history of being shady and dodging payments, why do people think they’re, all of a sudden, going to make sure they take care of us and pay us all the money they promised?

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  11. Fred

    This was just posted on the Keep Rhode Island Beautiful Facebook page.

    Attention! We have been advised that the Burrillville Land Trust is looking for a few individuals who went to the Johnston Town meeting last week regarding selling water to Invenergy for their proposed power plant. The BLT along with RI Common Cause is filling a law suit against the Town of Johnston in violation of the Open Meetings Act. The suit alleges that those who attempted to get into the meeting were denied access.
    The BLT needs a few citizens that were denied access to sign a complaint form for the Rhode Island Chapter of the ACLU who would hep file the lawsuit. Please contact proselli@cox.net if you are interested in being involved or reach out to us and we can get you in touch with the BLT.

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  12. Pawtucket City Councilor Kallman expresses concerns over Invenergy’s business practices

    […] the first meeting of the Pawtucket City Council since Councilor Terrence Mercer suggested that Pawtucket Water Supply Board (PWSB) look into being the back-up water supplier to Invenergy, […]

  13. Pawtucket opposes power plant, won’t be selling Invenergy water

    […] interest to anti-power plant activists because a month ago Pawtucket City Councilor Terrence Mercer suggested the city council endorse the power plant, saying, “If the plant’s going to be built, and if […]

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