Bob Plain is the editor/publisher of Rhode Island's Future. Previously, he's worked as a reporter for several different news organizations both in Rhode Island and across the country.

5 responses to “Holiday Tree Debate About Freedom, Not Christmas”

  1. David Pepin

    At 11:30 a.m., Chafee sent out a press release that the Statehouse tree lighting would be held at noon today.
    In other news, the wailing and gnashing of teeth from Wampanoag Trail was heard across the state.

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  2. Portsmouth Citizen

     
     
    Bob:
    –station of record?
    –loyal listener?
    –preserve the station’s position in our heritage?
    –expect more from WPRO?
    Sorry. I’ve long ago given up on the cesspool of ideas radiating out of WPRO. I’m old enough to remember listening to PRO a.m. for the top 40 music while I sunbathed on the beach in the summers. Today, other than “traffic on the sixes,” I never listen to it. It used to be my go-to station during emergencies. But, during hurricane Sandy I tuned in RIPR for the duration. 
    So by all means continue what you’re doing. I praise you for fighting the good fight and taking them to task for turning their microphone over to the rants of DePetro. 

    Will Rogers said, “It takes a lifetime to build a good reputation, but you can lose it in a minute.” Well WPRO has lost their reputation, and I’m not sure they can win it back in my lifetime.
     

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  3. David Vogel

    @Bob,
     
    I agree with the remarks of Portsmouth Citizen — wpro (the station does not even deserve capital letters) is a right-wing shill that spews garbage from every nook and cranny of its regular programming.
     
    While the station does not seem capable of transforming its collective crassness and hypocrisy, your behavior — as the self-proclaimed curator of the on-line home for progressives here in Rhode Island — is, in my eyes, on the verge of destroying your credibility.
     
    I don’t recall reading anything authored by you regarding wpro’s biased coverage of issues and candidates during the months leading up to the election.  You would need to show me where you took the station to task for trashing everyone except the republicans, or ensuring that only certain candidates were included in debates, or even about the fact that they lied about “speaking” with candidates (I know for a fact that they lied more than once when they claimed on the air they had tried to contact me for certain things).
     
    In a move that both surprised me and disgusted me, your public endorsement for congress in your district went to an incumbent over the true progressive — not because it was the correct thing to do, but for what I can only surmise is the human concern with “safety” over practicing what you preach.
     
    A true progressive would never have done that.
     
    And now, after your tacit approval of the antics of wpro during a period of time when you should have been beating the drum rather loudly, and after your inexcusable insult of Abel Collins (not to mention the abject hypocrisy that it showed to not support Mr. Collins), you have the unmitigated gall to speak up regarding an issue that, while it makes headlines right now, will have zero consequence once the calendar flips to December 26th?
     
    Spare me.
     
    As mentioned, your credibility for me is almost gone.  Because I was raised me to give second chances, I will continue to check in with rifuture for a while.  However, if the site continues for another few weeks down what I see as a hopelessly hypocritical path, you will have lost a reader and, whether you care or not, will have changed the way I speak of you…. that is, if I even bother to mention this site at all once I have stopped paying attention.
     
     
    David

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  4. cailin rua

    I don’t expect all that much from “progressives”.  I expect to see a policy focus similar to that of the Center for American Progress whose finger prints were all over Providence during the Netroots Nation gathering last June.  One has to realize that CAP chair, John Podesta, is also the founder of Podesta Associates and, according to Wikipedia, “has close ties to the Democratic Party and the Obama administration [and] has been retained by some of the biggest corporations in the country, including Wal-MartBP and Lockheed Martin.”[9] ”  That’s right, Walmart . . . etc.

    There was a station around here that attempted to try things that were really progressive.  It was WBRU.  I remember how frustrated d j’s with a little bit of taste, like Joe Thomas, seemed to be with the commercial format of top 40 stations, as WPRO was circa 1969.  There was a cultural divergence, at that time that has resulted in the kind of reactionary agenda the station has now.  

    WBRU was taken over by the American Broadcasting system in the mid/late seventies, I think.  Anything that was progressive about it was co-opted.  What was once eclectic programming crossing over into diverse genres became “progressive rock”, which we now know as “classic rock” heard on other stations with an audience that might consider itself progressive but is actually reactionary for the most part.

    My uncle did the fishing reports for the Salty Brine show in the sixties.  I understand the nostalgia but WPRO was bought from Cherry and Webb in the late fifties by Capitol Cities Broadcasting, which was affiliated with William Casey, Reagan’s director of the CIA.  It is owned by Cumulus Media, right now.  I am only going to provide one link so this reply does not go into moderation:

    http://www.bostonradio.org/essays/providence

    WPRO has an interesting past.  I think it would be good for everyone to be aware of who the station represents.  Basically it is an Operation Mockingbird type of entity, which all the commercial media is.  Just check out the Sourcewatch article on Cumulus Media with the references to what it did to the Dixie Chicks and the pro Iraq War demonstrations it promoted.  There is nothing to celebrate about WPRO and the influence it has exerted.

    I read part of David Sharfenburg’s piece in the Phoenix about the demise of the Journal.  I don’t get any of this reverence for the media one sees exhibited by people in journalism.  I really think it’s kind of pathetic.  I don’t expect to see anything insightful written about the media here, in the Phoenix or WRNI On Politics.  Even at these venues one never reads anything about how someone like Chomsky, Klein, Hedges, Scahill or Greenwald would critique them. Corporate influence is the number one political problem in the U S.  The medium used to exert that influence is the media.  The medium is the message and the medium is the commercial media and the commercial media is the problem.

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  5. cailin rua

    I don’t expect all that much from “progressives”.  I expect to see a policy focus similar to that of the Center for American Progress whose finger prints were all over Providence during the Netroots Nation gathering last June.  One has to realize that CAP chair, John Podesta, is also the founder of Podesta Associates and, according to Wikipedia, “has close ties to the Democratic Party and the Obama administration [and] has been retained by some of the biggest corporations in the country, including Wal-Mart, B P and Lockheed Martin.  That’s right, Walmart, BP . . . etc.
    There was a station around here that attempted to try things that were really progressive.  It was WBRU.  I remember how frustrated d j’s with a little bit of taste, like Joe Thomas, seemed to be with the commercial format of top 40 stations, as WPRO was circa 1969.  There was a cultural divergence, at that time that has resulted in the kind of reactionary agenda the station has now.  
    WBRU was taken over by the American Broadcasting system in the mid/late seventies, I think.  Anything that was progressive about it was co-opted.  What was once eclectic programming crossing over into diverse genres became “progressive rock”, which we now know as “classic rock” heard on other stations with an audience that might consider itself progressive but is actually reactionary for the most part.
    My uncle did the fishing reports for the Salty Brine show in the sixties.  I understand the nostalgia but WPRO was bought from Cherry and Webb in the late fifties by Capitol Cities Broadcasting, which was affiliated with William Casey, Reagan’s director of the CIA.  It is owned by Cumulus Media, right now.  I am only going to provide one link so this reply does not go into moderation:
    http://www.bostonradio.org/essays/providence
    WPRO has an interesting past.  I think it would be good for everyone to be aware of who the station represents.  Basically it is an Operation Mockingbird type of entity, which all the commercial media is.  Just check out the Sourcewatch article on Cumulus Media with the references to what it did to the Dixie Chicks and the pro Iraq War demonstrations it promoted.  There is nothing to celebrate about WPRO and the influence it has exerted.
    I read part of David Sharfenburg’s piece in the Phoenix about the demise of the Journal.  I don’t get any of this reverence for the media one sees exhibited by people in journalism.  I really think it’s kind of pathetic.  I don’t expect to see anything insightful written about the media here, in the Phoenix or WRNI On Politics.  Even at these venues one never reads anything about how someone like Chomsky, Klein, Hedges, Scahill or Greenwald would critique them. Corporate influence is the number one political problem in the U S.  The medium used to exert that influence is the media.  The medium is the message and the medium is the commercial media and the commercial media is the problem.

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